Ariz. Bill Seeks to Increase Liability Car Insurance Minimums

Capitol Building in Phoenix ArizonaA piece of legislation was introduced in Arizona this week that would increase the minimum amount of car insurance coverage required for liability policies there.

Currently, state law requires that drivers have an Arizona car insurance policy that provides at least:

  • $15,000 in liability coverage for a single person injured or killed in a crash
  • $30,000 in liability coverage for multiple people injured or killed in a crash
  • $10,000 in liability coverage for property damage in a crash

The bill, called HB 2165, was introduced this week in the state House by Victoria Steele and Ethan Orr, both representatives from Tucson. HB 2165 would change minimums by requiring that drivers have at least:

  • $25,000 in liability coverage for a single person injured or killed in a crash
  • $50,000 in liability coverage for multiple people injured or killed in a crash
  • $20,000 in liability coverage for property damage in a crash

Most states require auto insurance minimums by law to ensure that drivers are financially protected in the event of a crash.

Last year, a piece of legislation in Illinois raised minimums to the 25/50/20 levels sought in Arizona’s HB 2165.

Ohio’s liability minimums increased to 25/50/25 after a piece of legislation went into effect in late-December. Lawmakers who lent heavy support to the bill, HB 278, in 2012 said that it would apply a much-needed update to the coverage requirements in Ohio, which had enforced the lowest minimums nationwide before the change.

A state trade organization said that one result from the Ohio bill would likely be “an uptick” in premiums for policyholders who have policies at minimum levels.

About Charles Nguyen
Charles Nguyen is an enterprising journalist who reported for Patch.com and the Desert Dispatch and was the editor in chief of the Guardian (the twice-weekly newspaper at the University of California, San Diego) before coming to Online Auto Insurance News.

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